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Electro back then was electric funk and hiphop music, mainly for break-dancing, bee-bopping, and body-popping. In my opinion, the word ‘Electro’ today has been hijacked in the form of 4/4 dance music and not anywhere near its true roots.

I am providing you with four Electro albums for download. I recorded them directly from vinyl into Protools (Electro-6, 7 & 9 in particular), digitally restored as much as possible, and widened the stereo field, among other quick fixes. Go ahead an compare my mastered versions to the same ones you find elsewhere — mine sound the best.

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Streetsounds Protools Mastering

Streetsounds History…

Streetsounds was part of the UK Streetwave stable of labels created by Morgan Khan. A Hong Kong-born Indian who grew up in London, Khan had worked in the UK record industry since the mid 1970′s, working for such names as PRT Distribution (a division of Pye Records) and R&B Records, for whom at the time Imagination were the up and coming stars of the day.

Khan founded the independent Streetwave record label during 1981 to specialise in releasing Electro and Hi-NRG releases. Within a year of creation, Streetwave began the Streetsounds series of albums; compilations created from some of the hottest 12″ imports of the day. These releases made available a selection of the most contemporary dance floor hits within the financial reach of those wanting to hear the freshest sounds. In the early 80′s a 12″ single was priced around £2 and you would pay over £4 for an import 12″. The Streetsounds series offered usually 8 to 12 full-length 12″ mixes for under a fiver. Understandably, the Streetsounds series was met with considerable enthusiasm and, some might say, mighty relief.

This series would run for over 6 years and contain over 50 albums. By far the most coveted of the Streetsounds releases were the Electro series. These albums introduced the UK to the developing hip-hop scene from America – a stroke of genius that brought electro and early hip hop from the underground to the UK high street and, one could argue, helped in the creation of the UK’s hip hop scene.

The Electro series ran for a total of 27 albums (and one box set) from 1982 to 1988. The albums were initially labeled “Streetsounds Electro” with the title morphing into “Streetsounds Hip Hop” after release 12 in 1986.

All of the albums were competently mixed by a series of the best remixers of the day – predominately from the UK. A large proportion of the mixes on the early releases were completed by a London-based hip-hop sound system from the early 80s. Headed by “Herbie The Mastermind” (aka Herbie Laidley) the team also featured Kiss FM radio DJ’s Dave VJ and Max LX who were also members of UK electro outfit Hard Rock Soul Movement, responsible for the massive “Double Def Fresh” release.

Electro-9…

Mixed by: Herbie (The Mastermind) Laidley
Year: 1985
Restored & remastered by: Hashmoder

Streetsounds Electro-9 (mp3)

 

Electro-7…

Mixed by: Herbie (The Mastermind) Laidley
Year: 1985
Restored & remastered by: Hashmoder

Streetsounds Electro-7 (mp3)

 

Electro-6…

Mixed by: DJ Maurice Assisted by DJ N
Year: 1985
Restored & remastered by: Hashmoder

Streetsounds Electro-6 (mp3)

 

Electro-2…

Mixed by: Herbie (The Mastermind) Laidley
Year: 1983

Streetsounds Electro-2 (mp3)

 

Track-List of Electro-6, Electro-7 and Electro-9

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Video of ReMastering Session of Electro-6|7|9…

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I am so happy for having bought this rare 12-inch (45 rpm) single in London back in 1988.  When the original (album) version of Talkin All That Jazz was released internationally, it was an instant hit worldwide.  There was an extended version released on 12-inch, but having lived in UK half my life and knowing how that country is big on several kinds of remixes/versions of the same single, this particular remix of Talkin All That Jazz (Dominoes Mix) was the best one.  I remember hearing Dominoes Mix for the first time at Hippodrome nightclub (Picadilly Circus, London) in Fall-1988 …. oh man its bassline shook the roof, especially on that last note sustaining in the hook completing the measure (before the bassline lick repeats again on the one). Dominoes Mix is just steadier with a driving groove that is not as busy as the drums/bass in the original version, making it flow and kick more intensely.

Since Talkin All That Jazz is about sampling, it is worth noting that its bassline sample is taken a 1975 track “Dominoes (Falling Like)” by Donald Byrd which is a nice jazzy, funky fusion. This original track was provided by BeatElectric.Blogspot.com (thank you guys!).

Stetsasonic – “Talkin All That Jazz” (Dominoes Mix)…

Artist: Stetsasonic
Title: Talkin All That Jazz (Dominoes Mix)
Year: 1988
Media Source: Recorded straight from 12-inch record to digital.

Stetsasonic – “Talkin All That Jazz” (Dominoes Mix) (mp3)

 

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